Heritage strategies, what, why, where, how, by whom and for whom?

This learning module aims to introduce the concept of heritage and the international Conventions that have established a path to its proper management in the European context. To achieve this, how different strategies developed are presented, the historical reasoning behind their implementation, the social framework in which they have been developed, the different mechanisms involved and the long-term objectives of this development.

Heritage strategies, what, why, where, how, by whom and for whom?

Content Index:

Heritage strategies, what, why, where, how, by whom and for whom?
Introduction
Heritage in Europe
Historical Framework: the concept of cultural heritage and its evolution
Tangible-Intangible heritage
A Pan-European scope on Cultural Heritage
Integration of cultural and natural heritage in the new European concept: the European Landscape Convention
Framework Convention on the Value of Cultural Heritage for Society
Territorial Agenda of the European Union 2020
References
Strategies of conservation of cultural and natural heritage
Interconnected: cultural and natural heritage
Conservation of archaeological and natural resources
References
Integration of strategies in the European Framework (where): Internal Integration
The cultural heritage management sector
Unifying Europe’s cultural heritage management under common policies
Strategies for the conservation of natural heritage: the relation between World Heritage Convention and Agenda 21
Guidelines on the inscription of specific types of properties on the World Heritage List
UNESCO strategies for Cultural Landscapes and the Handbook for Conservation and Management
The values of natural heritage
Social engagement in heritage management and conservation
The relation between heritage and society as an everlasting cycle
Community engagement in action: the case of New South Wales policy
The controversial nature of community engagement
References
The social value of cultural and natural heritage (for whom): integration of both domains (external integration)
The weak relationship between mankind and heritage
Heritage in a society building process
Intangible heritage as an essential part of human identity
Heritage as an opportunity for economy and local development
UNESCO and the World Bank: two sides of the same coin
Interdisciplinary management as a responsibility towards environmental sustainability and the challenge of holistic management
Importance of natural and cultural landscapes for social construction
References
Heritage strategies, what, why, where, how, by whom and for whom? - Further reading
Further reading
Case Study: The concept of "cultural heritage" in the Spanish legislation
Introduction
The Protection of Cultural Heritage in an Unstable Kingdom
Democracy and Civil War
A Key Step for Spanish Historical Heritage
Cultural Heritage in 21st century Spain
References
Further reading
Case Study: Archeostorie
Introduction
Archeostorie: an informative training proposal
The theme: public archaeology
From public archaeology concept to action: community engagement
A project to build the complex value of heritage
References
Case Study: The Muskau Bend Landscape Park: strategies of linking and promotion of natural and cultural heritage
Introduction
Strategies of linking and promotion of natural and cultural heritage
References
Case Study: Vale de Côa, outdoor rock art
Introduction to Vale de Côa
Discovery of prehistoric art
Protection of prehistoric art
Creation of the Archaeological Park
References
Further reading
Case Study: Scotland’s Heritage Strategies
Introduction
Political Context
Scottish Devolution
Organisations
Policy Documents
Strategies
Conclusions
References
Further Reading
Case Study: Managing the Wadden Sea as a Heritage Site
Introduction
Natural heritage
Climate change
Conservation of the landscape heritage
Targets, policy and management
The LancewadPlan
References
Further Reading